Surfboard Showcase

See all of the surfboards, from Ancient Hawaii to the newest sustainable technology.

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POLYNESIAN PERFECTION

  1. Paipo – Traditionally breadfruit wood construction — historical to 1900′s
  2. Alaia – Shaped by Greg & Jed Knoll — Koa wood construction — historical to 1900′s
  3. Classic “Duke” Plank — Shaped by Duke — Redwood Construction — 1920’s
  4. Hollow Paddleboard — Shaped by Tom Blake — Mahogany — 1940’s
  5. PLASTIC FANTASTIC

  6. Bob Simmons Board — Balsa & fiberglass construction — 1950’s
  7. Hobie Longboard — Beginning of foam and fiberglass era — 1960’s
  8. Lightning Bolt — Shaped by Gerry Lopez – Polyurethane – 1970’s
  9. MR Twin Fin — Shaped by Mark Richards – Polyurethane — Late 1970’s
  10. Channel Islands Black Beauty — Shaped by Al Merrick – Polyurethane — late 1980’s
  11. Lost Roundnose Fish — Shaped by Matt Biolos – Polyurethane — late 1990’s — Ridden by Cory Lopez
  12. Stretch Fletcher Four Fin Quad — EPS & Epoxy materials — 2000’s
  13. FUTURE FORWARD

  14. T.Patterson ML-2 — Recycled EPS & epoxy resin – 2012 — Ridden by Mike Losness
  15. Lost Couch Potato — Recycled EPS and bio-based epoxy resin — 2013
  16. Channel Islands Semi Pro — Recycled EPS, bio-based epoxy — 2013
  17. T.Patterson Rising Sun — Recycled EPS, bio-based epoxy — 2013
  18. Firewire Spitfire — Paulownia wood — bio-based epoxy — 2013
  19. Donald Brink: The Flip Board (for surfing activities) — Recycled EPS, bio-based Epoxy — 2013
  20. Grain & Channel Islands: Biscuit — Hollow Wood & Bio Epoxy — 2013
  21. Jon Wegener Alaia — Paulownia wood & natural oil finish — 2013
  22. Enjoy Hand Plane — Recycled polyurethane & bio-based epoxy — 2013
  23. The Progress Project: Recycled Bag — Recycled PVC banner material from the Rip Curl Pro Search in San Francisco 2011
  24. Marko Foam Recycled EPS blank — recycled EPS from Waste to Waves
  25. Electric Surf Bike by icargobike.com — Yuba Mundo cargo bike w/ electric conversion

 
1. Paipo (Redwood Replica)
Traditionally Breadfruit Wood Construction — historical to 1900′s

The Paipo is considered the ground zero of wave riding, and was originally ridden “prone” (on the belly) or on the knees. Paipo boards traditionally ranged from 3 to 6 feet in length and were originally crafted using breadfruit wood; a plant brought over to Hawaii by Polynesians via canoes during colonization. The Paipo board is recognized as the true classic surf craft of Native Hawaiians.
 

2. Alaia (Replica)
Shaped by Greg & Jed Noll — Koa wood Construction — historical to 1900′s

The Alaia board was the go-to board for natives in the early days of Hawaii. They were traditionally made from beautiful Koa wood, which was harvested in the upward valleys of the ahupua’a. Alaia boards originally ranged from 5 to 12 feet in length, which allowed them to be the first boards ever ridden standing up. These boards set the precedent for the future of wave riding and craftsmanship.
 

3. Classic “Duke (Kahanamoku)” Plank
Shaped by Duke — Redwood Construction — 1920’s

Shaped by the Hawaiian legend himself, Duke Kahanamoku, this board is a blunt nosed, square-tailed redwood board made on the beach in Corona Del Mar (Newport Beach, California). Historically, redwood was introduced to Hawaii as a viable surfboard material after Queen Liliuokalani’s nephews discovered it during their time at the military academy in Santa Cruz, California.
 

4. Hollow Paddleboard
Shaped by Tom Blake — Mahogany Construction — 1940’s

Tom Blake’s hollow paddleboard represented a key transition in surfboards, moving away from a solid plank to something designed as a composite (similar to modern surfboards). The board’s hollow structure significantly reduced the weight. It was one of the very first surfboards to come with a fixed fin.
 

5. Bob Simmons Board
Balsa & fiberglass construction –1950’s

Constructed using a balsa wood core with fiberglass cloth wrapped all around it. This board was designed with cutting edge “planing hull” technology from naval architecture theory, making it lighter and more maneuverable than any surfboard that came before it. Notably, Simmons was the first shaper to use fiberglass in surfboards. This design essentially paved the way for the beginning of modern boards. Simmons inspired the transition from the hollow wooden paddleboard, toward modern composite surfboards.
 

6. Hobie Longboard
Beginning of foam and fiberglass era — 1960
’s
The Hobie Longboard greatly helped define the modern surfboard era. Hobie and his partners were arguably the first group to have a high production surfboard factory utilizing lightweight polyurethane foam. Abandoning conventional balsa wood core surfboards, Hobie’s boards represented the birth of the modern surfboard factory and the craftsmen associated with it.
 

7. Lightning Bolt
Shaped by Gerry Lopez – Polyurethane — 1970’s

Shaped by “Mr. Pipeline”, Gerry Lopez, the Lightning Bolt was considered the most high performance surfboard during its time. This board started a shortboard revolution in the surfing world and allowed surfers to ride critical waves previously considered impossible to surf, such as Pipeline. Lightning Bolt dominated its era with superior performance and a bold use of modern shapes, bright colors, big logos, and psychedelic artwork. This board injected new performance and aesthetic expectations into the surfing world.
 

8. MR Twin Fin
Shaped by Mark Richards – Polyurethane — Late 1970’s

When Mark Richard’s introduced his MR Twin Fin, surfing never looked back. Utilizing a two-fin system, this board brought forth a new style of high-performance surfing using maneuvers that a single fin simply wouldn’t allow. As a result, the MR Twin Fin revolutionized competitive surfing and pushed the progression of the sport harder than it ever had before.
 

9. Channel Islands: Black Beauty
Shaped by Al Merrick – Polyurethane — late 1980’s Ridden by Tom Curren

This board is the centerpiece of the thruster revolution and paved the way for the “uber shaper”. On this thruster, Tom Curren ushered the transition from simply riding waves, to absolutely ripping them. The bar in high performance surfing was raised higher than it ever had been before. As a result, this became the only competitive surfboard professional surfers would ride in its era.
 

10. …Lost: Roundnose Fish
Shaped by Matt Biolos – Polyurethane — late 1990’s
Ridden by Cory Lopez

This board led to the re-emergence of the “fish” as an alternative high performance surfboard design — after a period when thrusters had dominated the market for a span of 25 years. This board was one of the first to break the strangle hold that thrusters had on what pro surfers would ride. With a shorter and stubbier frame, similar to a skateboard, the LOST Roundnose Fish opened up new ways of riding on the wave or in the air. The stage was set for the 21st century of surfing.
 

11. Stretch: Fletcher Four Fin Quad
EPS & Epoxy materials — 2000’s

Stretch created this board and it soon became one of the quads that emerged as a viable high-performance shape. Stretch is also known for being a pioneer in EPS/epoxy construction, making an early shift to use only EPS/epoxy surfboard materials. This move helped open the eyes of the surfing world to different ways surfboards could be constructed. Thanks to boards like this, quads are now a normal offering by most surfboard manufacturers.
 

12. Timmy Patterson: ML-2
Recycled EPS & epoxy resin – 2012
Ridden by Mike Losness

This is the first surfboard to get an ECOBOARD Project verification label (serial # 001). Mike Losness rides this board in the Waste to Waves promo video, where he says it rides the same as any epoxy board he’s ever had. Timmy Patterson is a wizard with foam, and has always provided great feedback to improve sustainable surfboard materials. He was an early supporter of Sustainable Surf, and it’s fitting that he made the first verified ECOBOARD.
 

13. …Lost: Couch Potato
Recycled EPS and Bio-Based Epoxy Resin — 2013

This board highlights the aesthetic potential of sustainable materials in surfboard production, using intricate bamboo patchwork inlay and beautiful tinted bio-based resins. Glassed by Ryan Harris and Todd Patterson of E-Tech, incredible artists and leaders in today’s sustainable surfboard production. Made with Marko Foam recycled EPS, and Super Sap resin by Entropy.
 

14. Channel Islands: Semi Pro
Recycled EPS, bio-based epoxy — 2013

Example of how sustainable surfboard technology can create a white, high performance shortboard. The clear, bright white color exemplifies the progress that has been made in developing sustainable materials that meet the aesthetic standards of the shortboard market. Glassing and bamboo tail patches by E-Tech, a leader in sustainable surfboard glassing. Made with Marko Foam recycled EPS, and Super Sap resin by Entropy.
 

15. Timmy Patterson: Rising Sun
Recycled EPS, bio-epoxy — 2013

Vacuum bagged, bamboo veneer deck on a clear white shortboard. The bamboo adds considerable strength to a board, increasing its lifespan and reducing is lifetime carbon footprint. Vacuum-bagging is necessary to create a strong bond between wood and foam. This board was glassed by E-Tech, a leader in sustainable surfboard glassing. Made with Marko Foam recycled EPS, and Super Sap resin by Entropy.
 

16. Firewire: Spitfire
Paulownia wood — bio-epoxy resin — 2013

Firewire’s new Timbertek construction shows innovation in sustainable board construction. It includes the use of 3mm thick paulownia wood veneer and solid paulownia wood rails to increase strength and durability while reducing foam, fiberglass and resin. This construction uses 40% less fiberglass, 10% less resin, and 50% less foam than a typical shortboard. Paulownia wood is lightweight, waterproof, durable, and is sustainably grown in an FSC certified plantation in Asia. Glassed with Super Sap resin by Entropy.
 

17. Donald Brink: The Flip Board (for surfing activities)
Recycled EPS, Bio-Based Epoxy — 2013

Donald Brink is always pushing the boundaries of surfboard design. This unconventional shape provides the maximum flexibility in wave-riding experience. You can ride it prone, kneeling, or standing. It is designed to be flipped over depending on whether you are riding left or right. It has a “wave side” rail and a “beach side” rail that optimize wave riding performance and enjoyment. This board won Best of Show at The Boardroom in 2013. Glassed with Super Sap resin by Entropy.
 

18. Grain & Channel Islands: Biscuit
Hollow Wood & Bio Epoxy — 2013

Paying homage to Tom Blake’s original hollow surfboard, this is the modern shortboard made with a hollow wood construction that eliminates all foam. It is collaboration between Grain Surfboards and Channel Islands. Grain is also known for conducting very popular classes across the country for people to make their own surfboards, bringing back the “do it yourself” ethic of building surfboards. Glassed with fiberglass and Super Sap resin.
 

19. Jon Wegener: Alaia
Paulownia wood & natural oil finish — 2013

This is a modern take on the ancient Hawaiian Alaia board. This board exemplifies the rediscovery of traditional methods of riding waves and the deeper connection between modern surf culture and ancient Hawaii. Jon Wegener and his brother Tom have earned recognition for reviving the Alaia surfboard experience. They are now moving it forward into the 21st Century with fresh new designs.
 

20. Enjoy Hand Plane
Recycled polyurethane & bio-based epoxy — 2013

This hand plane is made by salvaging pieces of old, broken surfboards, and then reshaping and glassing them into a new wave-riding vehicle. Hand planes have gone through a modern revival because they are FUN, particularly when the waves are not the best. The environmentally conscious construction of this hand plane showcases a modern solution for material re-use and sustainability.
 

21. Recycled EPS blank from Marko Foam Blanks
Recycled EPS
This is a recycled EPS blank made from waste styrofoam. Marko Foam is a leader in processing recycled polystyrene material and making a new surfboard blank. Blanks are a technically demanding use of foam, as most foam is rarely shaped with tools, planers, sanders, etc… Marko has perfected their recycled EPS technology, and it shapes almost as easily as virgin EPS, but has 40% less environmental impact (on a lifecycle CO2 basis).
 

22. The Progress Project: Recycled Bag
Recycled PVC banner material from the
Rip Curl Pro Search in San Francisco 2011

This bag is made from the actual contest banners used in the Rip Curl Pro. PVC banners are very durable and can be recycled into beautiful bags for surfboards and other products. Many surf contests are now using The Progress Project.
This contest was the first Deep Blue Surfing Event organized by Sustainable Surf. It ran on 100% biodiesel from local SF restaurants, achieved a 90% waste diversion ratio, and became “carbon neutral” through the purchase of carbon offsets.
 

23. Electric Surf Bike by icargobike.com
Yuba Mundo cargo bike w/ electric conversion

This is the perfect vehicle to get to the beach with the lowest carbon footprint. With a huge cargo capacity, a top speed of 25 mph, effortless hill climbing capability, and a 35 mile range on one charge, this is a true “car replacement” bicycle.

This is the ultimate strike vehicle to surf Trestles. Icargobikes is located in south San Clemente, and has demo bikes available.